Navigating Ego Storms

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In a previous post I described an image I use for the state of being bound to the ego. Meister Eckhart uses the term ichgebundenheit to describe this state. In my image the eye of a hurricane recklessly swings me around its periphery, subjecting me to a destructive array of errant ego-blasts, each one taking me farther away from the calm of the eye. Divine Presence resides in that center, calling me away from the storms I conjure.
Thich Nhat Hanh likens the state to clinging to the top of a tree during a storm, not a very safe place to be. In a collection of meditations he shared with prison inmates,

In a previous post I have described an image I use to describe the state of being bound to the ego. Meister Eckhart uses the term ichgebundenheit to describe this state. In my image the eye of a hurricane recklessly swings me around its periphery, subjecting me to a destructive array of errant ego-blasts, each one taking me farther away from the calm of the eye. Divine Presence resides in that center, calling me away from the storms I conjure.
Thich Nhat Hanh likens the state to clinging to the top of a tree during a storm, not a very safe place to be. In a collection of meditations he shared with prison inmates, Be Free Where You Are, he shares the spiritual practice,”The Art of Handling a Storm.”

“The Art of Handling a Storm”

When a strong emotion takes hold of you and you can’t seem to let it go, get into a stable position in which you feel grounded (sitting with feet planted firmly on the ground, lying down.) Focus away from the storm in your head and turn your attention to the stability of your belly. Feel your hands firmly in place on your belly and begin breathing in and out. With each inhale say,”Breathing in I feel my abdomen rise,” with each exhale say,”Breathing out I feel my abdomen fall.”

Thich Nhat Hanh assures us that after twenty minutes of this we will feel strong and after a while the emotion will pass. I may follow this up with a mantra that brings me into divine presence, such as Julian of Norwich’s words,”All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of thing shall be well.”

May we all be well, friends.

Peace.

 

 

 

Photo Credit: https://www.google.com/search?q=trees+in+wind+free+clip+art&tbm=isch&ved=2ahUKEwimwsn12IXkAhWikJ4KHZPwAXIQ2-cCegQIABAC&oq=trees+in+wind+free+clip+art&gs_l=mobile-gws-wiz-img.3…8205.10155..11718…0.0..0.174.665.0j5……0….1………33i10j30i10.2L-WKL4lpUw&ei=wb1VXebdIKKh-gST4YeQBw#imgrc=JTbPelTwTNLzbM

When the Sky Is Falling

 

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When we are at home in our souls our actions flow freely with great power to change situations for the greatest good.

All shall be well
and all shall be well
and all manner of thing
shall be well.

Dame Julian of Norwich

 

Or

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Photo Credit: pexels.com

SHOWINGS

hummingbird

Here in the Pacific Northwest of the United States we are usually blessed with mild winters.  My apologies to the frozen regions!  Hummingbirds linger through our winters if their human friends faithfully feed them.  These creatures astound me.  They can stop dead while moving at full throttle; they go forward and backward, up and down, and hover to assess their surroundings.  They flap their wings fifty times a second, and because of their breathing, heart rate, and high body temperature, they have to feed every ten minutes.  Ruby-throated hummingbirds travel two thousand miles from Panama to Canada, five hundred miles of that journey non-stop over the Gulf of Mexico.  In the Americas, indigenous people have long deemed hummingbirds messengers between the worlds.

Within a period of four months I encountered the spiritual power of this symbolic creature.  She showed herself in a trilogy of experiences, first on a November night, flapping her wings (fifty times a second!) in my left ear, grazing my nose as she flew by, and rested at my right ear to sing a sacred song from beyond.  Then on a cold and snowy December day she came to my artificial Christmas tree out on the deck and drank from the bright red ornament.  One Wednesday in February a group of teachers gathered outside at the Stations of the Cross to pray for a family whose baby had been stillborn.  As we prayed the messenger appeared next to me, drinking from the winter-deadened blossom of a rose bush.

She has continued to be a constant, enduring companion.

i
First met you
“Midway upon the journey
Of [my] life.”

You with hummingbird

Were always here
While I was always there.
At last I hovered
Long enough to catch the
Shimmering glint of wings
And hear the melody
From beyond,
A double-edged, enigmatic message,
Compassion and justice,
Safely sheathed in Love.

More than midway upon
My journey now,
Melody morphs into
Concerto,
Foreground becomes background-
The Ground of my Being
Where I encounter
The Messenger.
Enduring, faithful companion,
We.

© rita h kowats 2014

“Midway upon the journey
Of [my] life.”  from Dante’s Divine Comedy

photo from royalty free vector source, http://www.polyvore.com/hummingbird_image_vector_clip_art/thing?id=22216447

SHOWING:  Dame Julian of Norwich, a medieval English anchoress and mystic used this word to mean revelations to her from God.